Rina Peleg

Artist Statement

I grew up in Israel on a kibbutz. Almost everywhere one walked, one practically stumbled over pottery shards. These fragments are sometimes the only evidence of the rich cultures that existed in the Middle East in the past. My first acquaintance with clay was made through these fragments.

I actually began working with clay after high school, when I discovered the raw material and became aware that almost any shape could be made from the formless mass. At first, I worked with the potter’s wheel, making functional pieces to be used at home. I gradually discovered the many possibilities inherent in the material, and began to make explorations in new directions.

Working with clay became a way for me to make contact with the world outside the kibbutz, and, ultimately, outside Israel.

While attending Alfred University, I worked on hand-coiled clay structures that involved a play of unconnected coils within the structures. This experience taught me that a coil could be used the way rope or string is used in waving and plaiting and I began to “weave” with these clay coils. Since the woven coils were basically the same sort of coils I had used for traditional pinched pots, the transition was simple and involved only a slight change in technique. Past weaving experience made this transition a natural one for me. Weaving in clay had become a natural activity for me.

I have been concerned for several years with the so called “right” of the ceramicist to create non-functional works. My own reason for making such works was, and is, a strong attraction to deal with basic classical shapes. This clearly came about from a deep emotional need, not a practical intent.

I began to understand some of the sources from which I drew my ideas upon learning Jung’s theory of the collective unconscious. Stated simply, Jung maintains that there is a collective unconscious of the whole human race which manifests itself in each individual through that persons dreams, or, in my case, through creativity. The basic shapes of ceramic utensils which were used ages ago, as well as the technique of making them, also form a part of the collective unconscious.

My need to make the shapes I do can be explained in part, if such explanation is necessary, by Jung’s theory, my own acquaintance with the history of arts and crafts, and a strong personal need.

Resume

Rina Peleg lives and works in NYC.

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS:

2007

Rhonda Schaller Studio, NY (solo)

2006

Studios 39, NY (solo)

2006

Rhonda Schaller Studio, NY

2005

54th Concorso Internazionale Della Ceramica D’Arte Contemporaneas, Italy

2004

Jane Hartsook Gallery, NY (solo)

2003

2nd World Ceramics Biennial, South Korea

2002

Franklin Parrasch Gallery, NY

2001

65 Hope Street gallery, NY (solo)

2001

Nordjyllands Kuntsmuseum, Aalborg, Denmark

1990

International Ceramics, Mino Japan

1989

Linda Carson Gallery, Denver, CO

1988

Klutznick Museum Washington, D.C

1988

The Queens Museum, NY (solo)

1987

Museum of Art and Design, NY

1987

Graham Modern Gallery, NY

1986

Snug Harbor Gallery, NY

1985

New York State Museum, Albany NY

1985

Everson Museum of Arts, Syracuse, NY (solo)

1985

Robert Kidd gallery, Detroit MI (solo)

1984

Brainerd Art Gallery, Potsdam, NY

1983

Heller Gallery, NY (solo)

1983

Mabat Gallery, Tel Aviv,Israel (solo)

1983

Robert Kidd gallery, Detroit, MI (solo)

1982

40th Concorso Internazionale Della Ceramica D’Arte Contemporaneas, Italy

1982

Form & Function, Atlanta, GA (solo)

1982

Cooper-Hewitt Museum, NY

1982

Robertson Center for the Arts, Albany NY

1981

Tel Hai Contemporary Art Festival, Israel

1981

Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston Mass

1981

Renwick Gallery, National Museum of American Art

1981

Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.

1981

John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan, WI

1981

Greenville County Museum of Art, Greenville, South Carolina

1981

Tweed Museum of art, Duluth, MI

1981

Downy Museum, Los Angeles, CA

1981

Thorpe Intermedia gallery, Sparkill NY

1981

Theo Portnoy Gallery, NY (solo)

1980

Memorial Art Gallery, University of Rochester, NY

1980

Albright-Know Gallery, Buffalo, NY

1980

Parsons School of Art and Design, NY

1980

Appalachian Craft Center, Tennessee

1980

Otis Gallery, Losa Angeles, CA

1979

Haharetz Museum, Tel Aviv, Israel (solo)

1976

Incorporated gallery, NY (solo)

1972

American-Israeli Cultural Foundation, NY (solo)

COLLECTIONS:
Burchfield-Penny Art Center, Buffalo, NY
Davis and Brody Architects, New York, NY
Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, NY
Greenville Art Museum, Greenville, South Carolina
Haharetz Museum, Tel Aviv, Israel
Israeli Embassy, Washington D.C.
Lannon Foundation, Palm Beach, Florida
Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY
Robertson Center for the Arts, Albany, NY
Schein-Joseph International Museum of Ceramic Art, Alfred University
Tajimi Cutlural Hall, Tajimi City, Japan

GRANTS AND AWARDS:

2003

New York Foundation for the Arts, NY

2003

Gottlieb Foundation, NY

2003

2nd World Ceramics Biennial, Juror’s choice Award, South Korea

1987

Honorable Mention, International Ceramic, Mino Japan

1998

Pollack-Krasner Foundation, NY

1984

Nettie Marie Fellowship in Visual Arts, NY

1982

40th Concorso Internazionale Della Ceramica D’Arte Contemporaneas, Italy

1982

Artist in Residence, Art Park Lewiston, NY

1981

National Endowment for the Arts, Craftsman Fellowship

EDUCATION:

1980

MFA Alfred University

1960

BFA Bezalel Academy of Arts, Jerusalem